Two Way Phenomena of Diabetes and Dental Health

Current research also suggests that the relationship between severe gum disease and diabetes is two-way phenomena. Not only are people with diabetes more susceptible to serious gum disease, but serious gum disease may have the potential to affect blood glucose control and contribute to the progression of diabetes. Research suggests that people with diabetes are at higher risk for oral health problems, such as gingivitis and periodontitis. People with diabetes are at an increased risk for serious gum disease because they are generally more susceptible to bacterial infection, and have a decreased ability to fight bacteria that invade the gums.

The Surgeon General’s Report on Oral Health states that good oral health is integral to general health. Schedule your dentist’s appointment regularly in order to avoid severe complication related to oral health.

Paper Submission: editor.oralhygiene@omicsinc.com

Smoking and Alcohol: Most Prevalent Cause of Oral Cancer

Oral cancer refers to cancer occurring between the vermilion border of the lips and the junction of the hard and soft palates or the posterior one third of the tongue.

In the US, 3% of cancers in men and 2% in women are oral squamous cell carcinomas, most of which occur after age 50. As with most head and neck sites, squamous cell carcinoma is the most common oral cancer.

The chief risk factors for oral squamous cell carcinoma are smoking (especially > 2 packs/day) and alcohol use. Risk increases dramatically when alcohol use exceeds 6 oz of distilled liquor, 15 oz of wine, or 36 oz of beer/day. The combination of heavy smoking and alcohol abuse is estimated to raise the risk 100-fold in women and 38-fold in men. Squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue may also result from any chronic irritation, such as dental caries, overuse of mouthwash, chewing tobacco, or the use of betel quid. Oral human papillomavirus (HPV), typically acquired via oral-genital contact, may have a role in the etiology of some oral cancers; however, the role of HPV is not as clearly defined in oral cancer as it is in oropharyngeal cancer.

Our special issue based on Oral Biofilm and Oral Surgery

And keeping this in mind Journal of Oral Hygiene and Health is working on special issue based on “Oral Surgery” and “Oral Biofilm (periodontal diseases)” and invite all quality authors to make submission towards it till 30th of September 2015.

Submission: editor.oralhygiene@omicsinc.com

Choose your Mouthwash carefully

Brush, Floss, and Rinse mouth with mouthwash. From a young age, people are taught to follow this procedure to maximize the benefits of proper oral hygiene, but could mouth rinse actually cause more problems than good?

There are two categories of mouth rinses: cosmetic (over-the-counter) and prescription. Both products are meant to help remove oral debris before or after brushing. These products provide a pleasant taste in the mouth and temporary relief from bad breath while diminishing bacteria in the mouth. Therapeutic rinses are prescribed by a dentist and contain active ingredients that protect against some oral diseases.

Researcher’s Section:

Our special issue based on Oral Biofilm and Oral Surgery

And keeping this in mind Journal of Oral Hygiene and Health is working on special issue based on “Oral Surgery” and “Oral Biofilm (periodontal diseases)” and invite all quality authors to make submission towards it till 30th of September 2015.

Submission: editor.oralhygiene@omicsinc.com 

Dental plaques: Do’s and Do not’s

Plaque is a sticky layer of material containing bacteria that accumulates on teeth. Many of the foods we eat cause the bacteria in our mouth to produce acids. Sugary foods are obvious sources of plaque, but there are others that you might not realize can cause harm.

The best way to remove plaque is by brushing and cleaning between your teeth every day.  Brushing removes plaque from the tooth surfaces. Brush your teeth twice per day with a soft-bristled brush. The size and shape of your toothbrush should fit your mouth and allow you to reach all areas easily. Use an antimicrobial toothpaste containing fluoride, which helps protect your teeth from decay. Cleaning between the teeth once a day with floss or interdental cleaners to remove plaque can also work, where the toothbrush can’t reach. Flossing is essential to prevent gum disease.

Researcher’s Section:

Our special issue based on Oral Biofilm and Oral Surgery

And keeping this in mind Journal of Oral Hygiene and Health is working on special issue based on “Oral Surgery” and “Oral Biofilm (periodontal diseases)” and invite all quality authors to make submission towards it till 30th of September 2015.

Submission: editor.oralhygiene@omicsinc.com 

To keep your smile, healthy, bright and fine

The key to keeping a bright, healthy smile throughout adulthood is to adapt best oral hygiene habits. Adults can get cavities, as well as gum disease that can lead to serious problems throughout your life, and hence it might be important to continue with some of the basics of oral hygiene:

  • Brush twice a day with fluoride toothpaste to remove dental plaque as the sticky biofilm on your teeth that’s the main cause of tooth decay and inflammation of the gums, called gingivitis.
  • Floss daily to remove plaque from between your teeth and under your gum line, before it can harden into tartar. Once tartar has formed, it can only be removed by a dental hygienist during a professional cleaning.
  • Limit sugary or starchy foods, especially sticky snacks. The more often you snack between meals, the more chances you give bacteria to create the acids that attack your tooth enamel.
  • Visit your dentist regularly for professional cleanings and checkups.

Researcher’s Section:

Our special issue based on Oral Biofilm and Oral Surgery

And keeping this in mind Journal of Oral Hygiene and Health is working on special issue based on “Oral Surgery” and “Oral Biofilm (periodontal diseases)” and invite all quality authors to make submission towards it till 30th of September 2015.

Submission: editor.oralhygiene@omicsinc.com